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Buy ‘Remaking Kurosawa’ for less than half the retail price

Remaking KurosawaMy second copy of D.P. Martinez‘s new Kurosawa book Remaking Kurosawa: Translations and Permutations in Global Cinema arrived today, this time from Amazon.co.uk, where I originally placed my pre-order back in March.

What this means is that the book is now shipping also in Europe, and that Amazon.co.uk is keeping the £13.99 price tag (around $23 or €16), which is less than one third of the book’s actual retail price. Even if you order the book to the US, you will pay less than half of what you would pay ordering from Amazon.com, shipping included! Considering that Amazon.co.uk ships worldwide., I don’t know if there is any reason to wait for the paperback edition, of which there is no confirmation yet (what I have heard is that if there will be one, it’ll be published either in late 2010 or early 2011).

If you would like to make use of Amazon’s offer (mistake?), head over to Amazon.co.uk’s product page. Don’t be alarmed about the book’s subtitle or its product description. I still received the real thing by ordering from this page.

For more information about the book, see my review from two weeks ago.


Discussion

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cocoskyavitch

Good price! Ours (US) is listed at $60.14
Here:

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Ugetsu

I’ve just ordered it, hope it really is that price!

I did browse through the book in the wonderful Kinokuniya Bookstore in New York last week – I didn’t buy it due to the insane $75 price tag! It does look very interesting – she takes an explicitly social anthropological view of Kurosawas films. While my limited knowledge of social anthropology is of inpenetrable jargon filled books which take 300 pages to state the obvious, it seemed well written with some very interesting ideas. The reason I’m keen to read it through is that she seems to agree with my personal pet theory about Kurosawas films – that you can only really understand them by acknowledging that his films were part of an ongoing dialogue with his contemporary Japanese audience.

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